Williamstown, MA, Two Architectural Gems in a Day / by Stephan Green

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For visitors as well as residents of the Berkshires, two architectural gems in Williamstown, can comfortably fill a day. Apart from the many interesting buildings at Williams College and the Williamstown Theatre Festival, by well-known architects, the new Visitors' Center at the Clark Art Institute along with the Stone Hill Center by Tadao Ando is an exciting place to visit. The architecture makes one profoundly aware of the elegant simplicity of the building and strongly connects one with the surrounding landscape. This is a new treasure in the Berkshires. The processional experience of entering the building adds orientation, dimension and richness to the two older wings of the Clark Art Museum. 

For visitors as well as residents of the Berkshires, two architectural gems in Williamstown, can comfortably fill a day. Apart from the many interesting buildings at Williams College and the Williamstown Theatre Festival, by well-known architects, the new Visitors' Center at the Clark Art Institute along with the Stone Hill Center by Tadao Ando is an exciting place to visit. The architecture makes one profoundly aware of the elegant simplicity of the building and strongly connects one with the surrounding landscape. This is a new treasure in the Berkshires. The processional experience of entering the building adds orientation, dimension and richness to the two older wings of the Clark Art Museum. 

The Folly at Field Farm, part of the Trustees of Reservations properties, is the other pleasurable site to visit. A sculptural piece, a guest house, by the architect Ulrich Franzen, built in 1965 for $100,000, it is complex in form and space while possessing functional simplicity. The interior daylighting and artificial lighting is striking. The daylighting in particular is masterful. Franzen was a master architect and he clearly enjoyed the development and execution of this project. Our tour guide, Bob, was a fabulously, enthusiastic, knowledgeable guide and Jennifer, seen here with Bob, and I thoroughly enjoyed our visit. Below is a link to an article in the Berkshire Eagle with more information and photographs.  http://www.berkshiresweek.com/072204/default.asp?id=article04

The Folly at Field Farm, part of the Trustees of Reservations properties, is the other pleasurable site to visit. A sculptural piece, a guest house, by the architect Ulrich Franzen, built in 1965 for $100,000, it is complex in form and space while possessing functional simplicity. The interior daylighting and artificial lighting is striking. The daylighting in particular is masterful. Franzen was a master architect and he clearly enjoyed the development and execution of this project. Our tour guide, Bob, was a fabulously, enthusiastic, knowledgeable guide and Jennifer, seen here with Bob, and I thoroughly enjoyed our visit. Below is a link to an article in the Berkshire Eagle with more information and photographs. 

http://www.berkshiresweek.com/072204/default.asp?id=article04